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Friday, June 24, 2016

The MySpace Hack and Why You Should Care

If you haven’t heard yet, account information that was hacked from MySpace was recently put up for sale.

I know, you thought MySpace was dead, or you’re too young to remember just how big it was.
Well it isn’t dead and even if it was, the hack provided a plethora of login information.  Yes, that information was in many cases very old but that doesn’t mean it isn’t useful to the criminals who have obtained it.  This, as well as every hack, reveals just how vulnerable we all are online.  In the early days of the World Wide Web, security wasn’t in the forefront of most people’s minds.  Now, you can’t avoid it whether at work, home or at play.

So, why does this hack matter?  Well, many of us probably forgot that we even had these accounts let alone the login information we established at the site, and there may be other such accounts lurking out there that we haven’t accessed in some time.  Thing is, in our zeal to embrace the World Wide Web we probably have information posted at these sites, in addition to login credentials, that reveals enough about us to make us vulnerable to social engineering efforts.

Conversely, the login information may very well be the same as the credentials we setup at other sites that contain even more sensitive and valuable information, at least this is what the hackers are banking on, figuratively and literally.  People tend to use the same login credentials across accounts and this is an Achilles heel for all of us.

Over the years, we’ve been encouraged to create stronger and more unique passwords.  At work you’re most likely required to do so.  In fact, more and more commercial sites are requiring the same thing as well as requiring that you change your password frequently, at least more frequently than most of us like.  I do find some of the security questions interesting since many of the suggested ones are things that hackers find by way of social engineering to include mother’s maiden name, street where you lived, etc., which is why the forgotten sites that you may have used the same login credentials as MySpace can be lucrative for hackers and identify thieves.

So, if you’re a creature of habit and have used basically the same login credentials at multiple sites for years, you may want to consider changing your password at sites where you’re registered, especially those with access to financial, medical and other personal information.

For more info on the MySpace data up for sale and how to set a more secure password the following links will help:



http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2368484,00.asp

1 comment:

  1. If only hackers would put their talent to better use. Only in a perfect world! :)

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